Meet the NCMD team

 

The NCMD team’s flexibility and responses to local queries is impressive” Mike Leaf, Chair of Merseyside, Pan Cheshire and Lancashire CDOPs and former Director of Public Health

Professor Karen Luyt

Professor Karen Luyt

Programme Lead / Consultant and Professor of Neonatal Medicine, University of Bristol and University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust

Karen Luyt is the programme lead for the National Child Mortality Database. She read medicine in South Africa and specialised in Paediatrics (Neonatal Medicine) in the UK.

She has a clinical academic post, based in the Neonatal Intensive Care unit at St Michael’s Hospital, Bristol. In her academic position as Professor of Neonatal Medicine, University of Bristol, her research has focussed on optimising health outcomes in newborn infants. She was lead for neonatal mortality review for UHBristol NHS Trust since 2010 and the academic lead for child death review (University of Bristol) since 2014.

She contributed to the 2018 child mortality review guidance for England and chairs the British Association of Perinatal Medicine Neonatal Mortality Review Group.

Prof Peter Fleming, PhD, MB ChB, FRCP (London), FRCP (Canada), FRCPCH

Prof Peter Fleming, PhD, MB ChB, FRCP (London), FRCP (Canada), FRCPCH

Professor of Infant Health & Developmental Physiology, University of Bristol

After undergraduate training in Bristol and postgraduate training in paediatrics at the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London, and the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Peter returned to Bristol. From 1978 to 2012 he worked in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at St Michael’s Hospital and the Children’s Sleep and Developmental Physiology Laboratory at Bristol Children’s Hospital, and also led the service for children on long-term ventilatory support for the Southwest of England.

In 1983, Peter established the Avon Infant Mortality Study and, since that time, has continued to provide care and support to families bereaved by perinatal, infant and childhood deaths, particularly sudden or unexpected deaths.

Since January 2013 Peter has worked primarily in research, teaching and safeguarding children. Peter continues to conduct research on epidemiological and physiological factors contributing to unexpected deaths in infancy and childhood, and has co-authored more than 360 scientific publications. The approach to the care and investigations of families bereaved by the sudden expected death of their child that Peter pioneered in the Avon area has, since 2008, been adopted nationally in England under The Children Act 2004.

Prof Peter Blair

Prof Peter Blair

Professor of Epidemiology and Statistics, University of Bristol

Peter has a background in Medical Statistics and a particular interest in infant and childhood epidemiology. Born in Manchester, England, he studied Mathematics (BSc Hons) and Medical Statistics (MSc) before moving to Bristol where he completed his doctorate (Epidemiology of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) in 1998.

From his work on several major observational studies, he is a recognised expert in the SIDS field and was made an honorary fellow and advisor to UNICEF (UK) in 2009. In 2014, the Queen’s Annual Prize for Further and Higher Education was awarded to the University of Bristol based on Peter and his colleague Peter Fleming’s contributions in this field.

He is the elected Chair of the International Society for the study and prevention of Perinatal and Infant Death (ISPID) and chair of the epidemiological working group. Peter is also a senior consultant methodologist for both the University of Bristol Randomised Trials Collaboration Unit and the NIHR Research Design Service.

Dr David Odd

Dr David Odd

Honorary Senior Research Fellow, University of Bristol

David is a neonatal consultant at North Bristol NHS Trust and Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Bristol. He has experience is epidemiology, biostatistics, randomised clinical trials and systematic reviews. His main research interest includes the cause, prevention and outcomes after term, or preterm, brain injury.
Prof Jenny Kurinczuk, BSc, MBChB, MSc, MD, FFPH, FAFPHM, FRCOG honoris causa

Prof Jenny Kurinczuk, BSc, MBChB, MSc, MD, FFPH, FAFPHM, FRCOG honoris causa

Professor of Perinatal Epidemiology Director, National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit Director, NIHR Policy Research Unit in Maternal and Neonatal Health and Care National Programme Lead MBRRACE-UK/PMRT University of Oxford

Jenny Kurinczuk is a clinical epidemiologist and honorary consultant in public health at Public Health England; she is Director of the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU) and Director of the DH-funded NIHR Policy Research Unit in Maternal and Neonatal Health and Care based in the NPEU. Her research focuses on the causes and consequences of conditions from conception through pregnancy which affect mothers, their pregnancy outcomes and the health of babies as they develop during infancy, childhood and beyond. She is national programme lead for the MBRRACE-UK/PMRT collaboration responsible for the national confidential enquiries and surveillance of maternal and perinatal deaths, and development of the national Perinatal Mortality Review Tool.

Jenny is also a collaborator on studies of serious and ‘near miss’ maternal morbidity through the UK Obstetric Surveillance System (UKOSS) and the UK Midwifery Study System (UKMidSS). She led the development project which preceded and recommended the commissioning of the National Child Mortality Database and is a collaborator on the NCMD programme.

Vicky Sleap

Vicky Sleap

Project Manager, NCMD, University of Bristol

Vicky Sleap is one half of the Programme Manager role for NCMD, job-sharing with Sylvia Stoianova. With 10 years’ practical experience in the field of child death reviews, she has used her in-depth knowledge to train paediatricians and police forces on the child death review process and influence that process at a national level. Notably, Vicky has contributed to the writing of revised legislation and new national statutory and operational guidance on child death reviews, and she has contributed to the development of forms used within the process in England. Vicky has also acted as an international consultant, advising and assisting other countries in setting up child death review processes, and now frequently provides advice and support to child death professionals via webinars and conferences. Vicky is involved in ongoing collaboration with colleagues across a range of agencies including the National Crime Agency, Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch, MBRRACE-UK (Mother and Babies: Reducing the Risk through Audits and Confidential Enquiries across the UK), the British Association of Perinatal Medicine and the National Steering Group on Consanguinity and Genetic Risk.
Sylvia Stoianova

Sylvia Stoianova

Project Manager, NCMD, University of Bristol

Sylvia Stoianova is the NCMD project manager job-sharing this role with Vicky Sleap. She brings 15 years of experience, ranging from clinical audits and other measurement driven quality and service improvement projects working for Acute Central London Trusts and at London clinical networks’ level, to national and international work in disease registration and public health.

Along with her role with NCMD, Sylvia also works part-time for Public Health England’s National Congenital Anomaly and Rare Disease Registration Service leading on data quality improvement projects. Sylvia holds a Master’s degree in Health, Population and Society from the London School of Economics (LSE) with a focus on epidemiology, health policy and planning and demography; she also holds degrees in International Relations and Linguistics from Sofia University.

She is passionate about reducing health inequalities and improving the life and well-being of children and people with rare diseases, and is committed to contributing to projects that can turn knowledge and data into action.

Tom Williams

Tom Williams

Data Analyst, NCMD, University of Bristol

Tom joined the team in April 2019 and is the Data Analyst for the Programme. He analyses quantitative and qualitative data, identifying trends and translating this into meaningful reports.

Previously, Tom worked as a Health Intelligence Analyst for NHS Commissioning, providing analysis and reports using commissioning datasets to support decisions on the improvement of healthcare, and has developed many interactive dashboards to assist learning. He also has experience within Clinical Audit and Effectiveness at an NHS Trust, working on Local and National Audit Programmes, reviewing and assisting with NCEPOD reports and NICE guidance to facilitate the quality improvement process.

Rob Taylor

Rob Taylor

Managing Director, QES

Rob is the managing Director of QES, a software development house specialising in providing multi-agency information sharing systems. QES work almost exclusively in the Public Sector, providing both bespoke applications and product based systems, to the NHS, Local Authorities and Police.

Prof Peter Fonagy

Prof Peter Fonagy

Programme Director for Mental Health, UCL Partners

Professor Peter Fonagy OBE is Head of the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences at UCL; Programme Director for Mental Health, UCL Partners; Chief Executive of the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, London; Consultant to the Child and Family Programme at the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine; and holds visiting professorships at Yale and Harvard Medical Schools.

He has occupied a number of key national leadership positions including Chair of the Outcomes Measurement Reference Group at the Department of Health, Chair of two NICE Guideline Development Groups, Chair of the Strategy Group for National Occupational Standards for Psychological Therapies and co-chaired the Department of Health’s Expert Reference Group on Vulnerable Children.

His clinical interests centre on issues of early attachment relationships, social cognition, borderline personality disorder and violence.

Charlotte McClymont

Charlotte McClymont

Head of Programmes, UCLPartners

Charlotte is a Head of Programmes at UCLPartners where she leads a portfolio of child, maternal and mental health programmes.

Charlotte trained as a midwife, before working on several maternal and child health related research programmes, disease registries and national audit programmes at the University of Oxford, HQIP and PHE.

From 2012 to 2015 Charlotte was the programme manager for the UK and Ireland Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths (MBRRACE-UK).

Kate Hayter

Kate Hayter

NCMD Administrator, University of Bristol

Kate joined the NCMD programme team in September 2018. Her first involvement with the University of Bristol was as a mature student, completing a BSc in Zoology in 2005. Previously Kate has worked in business insurance and most recently in veterinary practice reception and administration.

She is delighted to be involved with such a socially important project as the National Child Mortality Database and provides administrative support to the team. Kate answers many of the queries received via the NCMD email and phone helpline.

Charlotte Bevan

Charlotte Bevan

Senior Research and Prevention Advisor, Sands

Charlotte Bevan has worked at Sands, the stillbirth and neonatal death charity, since 2004. She came to the charity after a career in journalism, shortly after the death of her own daughter, Hope, who died neonatally in in 2001.

Charlotte is now Senior Research and Prevention Advisor. Her role is to ensure the voices of bereaved families help shape research and health care improvements to support perinatal well-being and to prevent future tragedies wherever possible. She is a member of the MBRRACE-UK and the Perinatal Mortality Review Tool (PMRT) collaborations, and an advisor on NHS England’s Stillbirth Prevention Care Bundle.

She was the parent representative on Sands post mortem consent package, endorsed by the Human Tissue Authority. She contributes both as co-applicant and advisor on several research studies related to perinatal mortality, and has spoken both nationally and internationally on Sands’ work and her personal experience of loss.

Sarah Harris

Sarah Harris

Director of Bereavement Support and Education, Child Bereavement UK

Sarah is a Qualified Registered Child and Family Social Worker with over 20 year post qualifying experienced working with children, young people and their families. Prior to becoming a Qualified Social Worker, Sarah worked in social care and the voluntary sector, working within the areas of Adult Mental Health and Disability.

Prior to joining Child Bereavement UK, Sarah worked in the statutory sector, specialising in adult and child protection, safeguarding, safer recruitment, safe working practices, supervision and service development. Sarah’s previous role before joining Child Bereavement UK was as Principal Child and Family Social Worker, developing and leading nine Centres of Excellence as well as being a member of the Child Death Overview Panel.

Sarah is an experienced training facilitator and has designed and delivered training to statuary agencies, including Schools and NHS trusts as well as to third sector and voluntary organisations.

Dr Clea Harmer

Dr Clea Harmer

Chief Executive of Sands

Clea is the Chief Executive of Sands. With growing public awareness of the issues surrounding stillbirth and neonatal death, and a national commitment to reduce the number of babies dying, now is the moment when there is real potential to make a difference for parents. Sands works not only to reduce the number of babies dying, but also to improve the care and support received by anyone affected by the death of a baby.

Clea’s previous roles in NCT College, in Higher Education and in medicine have all contributed to a passionate belief in the importance of using research effectively to make a positive difference; but also in the importance of support for parents which enables them to make the decisions that are right for them.

Jenny Ward

Jenny Ward

Chief Executive of the Lullaby Trust

Jenny has worked for the Lullaby Trust since 2006 and is the charity’s Chief Executive. Jenny leads their bereavement support and information services for anyone affected by the sudden death of a baby or young child. The Lullaby Trust has successfully helped to decrease the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) rate in the UK dramatically in the past 30 years, but there is still work to be done to bring this figure even lower.

Jenny’s role covers both bereavement support and prevention, and as such she is involved in several projects that cover both areas of work. She led a project to describe the child death review process to families, and is keen to improve the processes bereaved families face at such difficult times.

More from this section: